Sunday, January 30, 2011

Layering Papers and writing into wet media

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Leslie here.  I love the combination of techniques and layers with water-based media.  The background page was created by brushing water onto the paper, then a watered-down wash of acrylic ink.  After the ink was applied I tipped the page to allow the fluid to spread, then I used the handle of my brush to write into the wet media.  The ink (watercolor will do this too) migrates to the writing, thereby creating a pale, ghost-like script.  I allowed this to dry slightly, but the paper still felt damp to the touch.  I applied a second wash, this time with a slightly darker ink but still using a very diluted wash.  I used the base of a plastic pen to push the wet media around.  Interestingly, this seemed to displace the ink rather than attract it!  Go figure.  Third, after allowing the first two processes to dry I pulled some white acrylic ink into a curved dental syringe and wrote more script over the top and from a different perspective.  This was, admittedly, pretty messy and it took a while to dry.  There was enough beading up of the script that I didn't dare use a blow dryer or heat gun for fear of moving the media on the page.  Good thing I was working on some screen printing to distract me!  Finally, I worked back into the writing with a darker blue fine-tip marker.  I did this because I knew I would have a darker blue image in the foreground and I thought a bit of darker script would marry the two pieces.
The paper in the foreground is the same type of 200 lb hot press watercolor paper.  I used the first thing I grabbed, and in retrospect I wish I had varied the texture of the papers.  Oh well.  I've been working on some new thermofax screens and like to test them on both cloth and paper.  This is actually 2 separate screens.  The nest was printed first and allowed to dry.  The bird image was screened with white and blue paint simultaneously.  After drying the prints I did more washes and writing into wet at the top of this paper, but with much more dilute pigment.  Finally, I used the syringe and dripped white acrylic ink from the top of the paper.  The papers are glued together.


11 comments:

  1. Loved reading about your technique.

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  2. very beautiful work. it is interesting to read your process, thank you for sharing!

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  3. Great picture. Everyone should click on the photo to zoom in. I think using the same weight paper was a good idea. I like how the ragged edge sets the top page from the background page.

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  4. I'm a huge fan of blue/white.
    my lastest sketch is black and white..another good combo.
    jill
    www.Jeudaly.blogspot.com

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  5. How unique. A curved dental syringe??? hmmmm....I think I need to go digging into the tool box. Great piece. thanks for sharing it.

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  6. Thank you for the detailed description! Beautiful work, Leslie.

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  7. Thank you for sharing your creative designs with us. I am having soooo much fun trying new mediums and sketching. Will have to play with this !!

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  8. I use the curved dental syringe very frequently in my work. This tool can be used with textile paint, matte medium, and thickened dye. The end of the syringe can be cut to enlarge the opening, but I rarely do that. Instead, I find that I can control the paint or dye if the consistency is similar to syrup. It works great on gelatin plate monoprinting, writing directly onto cloth and paper. I demo with one in a segment of QATV Season 7 on a silk screen, but it can be used directly on the surface of things! If using paint be sure to rinse fairly quickly or it will dry permanently in the syringe.

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  9. Thank you for sharing your techniques, Leslie. I am amazed at how different artists approach a page to work. I am learning so much from this challenge. Thanks to all.

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  10. Oh Leslie--that is so gorgeous. I can't wait to try it! I love how you create such complexity with a very narrow range of color. Wow!

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