Friday, September 13, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Kristin La Flamme

Kristin La Flamme here, and today is my day to share Houses and Hideaways. I have an ongoing quilt and textile collage series based on houses (when you're done here, pop on over to my blog/website to see some of them). Here, I'll share the way I build the houses since it can easily translate from cloth to paper.

I like to make a bunch at once and to try lots of colors and a few techniques. Then I can pick and choose later as my heart desires. I have a whole box of painted bits to dive into.
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Years ago, my son drew a picture of the row house we lived in. It was tall and skinny and a little wonky. I liked that instead of the classic peaked-box, detached house, his concept of a typical house more accurately depicted our reality -- and our community. So I use a variation on this skinny house a lot, like this one I did in my sketchbook:
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...and this one I made as a potential website header:
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My go-to house design is a stamped heart with a basic house shape drawn around it. I love making these and then embellishing them like the one above.
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I used to use makeup sponges to apply acrylic fabric paint to my stamps, but Deborah turned me on to "spouncers," and I love them.
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Sometimes I outline the houses with metallic gutta, used in silk painting. any number of craft paints in squeeze bottles would work though:
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Another tool I've used a lot is a tjanting tool, used to draw with hot wax. I fill mine with ink or thinned paint. On paper, a ruling pen is another excellent option:
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Yesterday, it wasn't going well with the tjanting tool, so I pulled out a lining brush and outlined a few houses with it:
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I made a stencil a while ago, so I used it on a few different fabrics:
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Fabric crayons are a good way to add a little depth. Regular crayons or oil pastels would be the obvious choice on paper:
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Now I've got a city's worth of little houses to piece together for a quilt, collage onto a canvas, or any other use I can think of.
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13 comments:

  1. Beautiful work but unfortunately the link to your blog isn't working when you click on "my blog":(

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  2. Natalie, try the link now. It should be working.

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    1. Thank you Sue for fixing it. Linking posts while they are both in the "scheduled" status isn't always a smooth process. ;-)

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  3. Of course I love this! Makes my fingers itch to do some stuff!

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  4. Thank you for posting this. I enjoyed seeing your houses and the story of your son.

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  5. Indeed lovely! I especially like the roots dangling...

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    1. Thanks. The ability, or rather inability, to put down roots is a reoccurring theme in my art.

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  6. I like all these techniques and I could easily apply them to my more maritime style houses. I love to do houses too!

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  7. I really love your work. Its so cute.

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  8. Oh wow Kristin! You totally blow me away with your creativity!

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  9. Your house stencil is particularly special. Love that you use a tjanting. I use one to sign my large paintings...works so well.

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  10. This series of yours has such a special place in my heart. I love how they have changed and yet, remained the same at heart.

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