Monday, September 30, 2013

classes, workshop, products and more!

We keep our commercial presence to one monthly post so that we can share other opportunities to take workshops, purchase art or enjoy other offerings from all of us. Check out our workshops and  books. Thank you for being a part of the Sketchbook Challenge! It's an honor to share this journey with you.

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Sue Bleiweiss's DVD "Coloring Book Fabric Collage" is now available for purchase or download on the Quilting Daily shop here.

In this DVD workshop Sue shares her “coloring book fabric collage”technique-a fused style that includes black lines reminiscent of the coloring book pages we colored as children. She takes you through the process of creating an art quilt from start to finish, from hand dyeing the fabrics through designing,fusing,free-motion quilting,and binding. Click here to visit the Quilting Daily Shop to order it or to watch a preview clip from it.







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Carol Sloan

Check out my Etsy shop for all of your thermofax screen needs!

I have lots of hand drawn images as well as copyright free vintage images.
I can do custom screens also.

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Lesley Riley



Back by popular demand, my Artist ASAP online class begins again on October 7. REGISTER NOW!



Artist ASAP is a self-guided class I created after years of coaching other artists to the successful realization of their dreams. I know not everyone can afford, or wants one-on-one coaching, but I still want to help as many artists as I can can want some solid information on how to move forward on their dreams.

The content is delivered weekly in both PDF and audio form. You can work at your own pace, at your own place. It's yours to keep and refer to forever. I could go on and on here, but it's much easier if you  just CLICK here and see for your self over at Artist ASAP.com.

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Create “juicy backgrounds” and a plethora of different no-sew bindings for your handmade books in this nearly 2-hour long Cloth Paper Scissors workshop! Artist Kari McKnight-Holbrook takes you through each step, including creating your own stamps made from flip flops to use in your book, developing a color hue for your backgrounds, and using rubber bands, paintbrushes, ribbon, and more to bind it all together!

Kari also has webinars at Cloth Paper Scissors Interweave store on her lettering style (Delectable Doodles and Beyond) and (Using your Creative Lettering).

For Kari's stamp line, please visit her Etsy store.

She will be teaching at Art & Soul in Portland, OR   Oct 1-6.
She will be exhibiting at The Country Living Fair in Atlanta, GA  Oct 25-27.
She will be teaching at Smitten Dust in Dimondale, MI  Nov 8-10.
For more info on these events, please visit Kari's workshop page on her blog.

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Lots of great tips and inspiration in Deborah's two webinars!

Learn how to use sheer materials in fabric collage. Check it out!

Using unexpected materials in fabric collage. Available for download!
Deborah's dvd workshop is also available. Plus, check out her brand new refreshed website and sign up for her e-newsletter.

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NEW ONLINE CLASS STARTS OCTOBER 28, 2013
Join Joanne Sharpe drawing, sketching, doodling and lettering with simple art supplies.  Make your life a masterpiece in  the sketchbook of your dreams!
REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
Watch what fun we'll have!

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Joanne Sharpe


....Make yourself at home in  Joanne Sharpe's playful, colorful, whimsical doodle houses. Words, a message or theme always inspires the direction my art will take when i sit down with my journals or sketchbook.  Of course, the SBC theme inspired me to just start doodling a fun collection of imaginary houses in my sketchbook.  As i was drawing and watercoloring the houses, i thought, "wouldn't it be fun to see this type of house in a real life, in a real neighborhood on a real street"?  Well, perhaps Disney World would be the most appropriate location home for this style of architecture.  It's probably a good thing that i never went into architecture and home design!  But i love these little row houses, flooded with color, and happy detail with windows streaming light.  Of course i added lettering, using "home" words and phrases as a pattern in the composition.
  ...can you see the little sparkle on the houses?
 ...I added some glittery accents to the page with the Zig Wink of Stella brush pens in the CLEAR color (which is just pure inky glitter right out of the brush).  The brush on this pen is the identical body of the Niji waterbrush.  When the pens are empty you can use it as a waterbrush, or fill it with your own inks.  Since i am a confessed "pen hoarder", it's one of favorite new tools.

I also made this "Home" doodle on another page and before i color it, i made a pdf to share, a little gift for you!  Grab your Tombow or Copic markers, watercolors, or colored pencils and add your own color palette.  Use it as a color study or an inspiration for your own home.  Paste it in your sketchbook or hang on your fridge, because that's what you do with your favorite art!
"Home is where your heart and soul lives"
 Here's the pdf to print and color.  The image size is about 5"x8" and will fit into a medium sized sketchbook.  Have fun in your cozy home!

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Jane LaFazio

houses and hideaways
artwork by Jane LaFazio
Jane LaFazio here. As were all of our Sketchbook Challenge artists, I was inspired by the Houses & Hideaways theme this month. As you can see, I carved 3 different style houses and stamped them into villages and towns in my sketchbook. 
houses and hideaways
hand carved stamps by Jane LaFazio
houses and hideaways
hand carved stamps by Jane LaFazio
houses and hideaways
sketchbook pages by Jane LaFazio
houses and hideaways
detail of sketchbook page ~ by Jane LaFazio
houses and hideaways
sketchbook page ~ by Jane LaFazio
I used permanent ink pads, so I could color the stamped images with watercolor.
houses and hideaways
sketchbook page by Jane LaFazio
Please head on over to my blog, to see a short video on how I created these Houses and Hideaways! (and a give away!)

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop - Laura Cater-Woods

Laura C-W here, returning to the Challenge after a hiatus. It's been a crazy time but life is settling down, finally. One thing that has helped me get back on track is my time away from home and studio.The visits to the"treehouse" Hideaway soothe me, inspire me, allow me to quiet down and center. 
Here is the view from the main deck at the treehouse. It is a remote location, completely off the grid, quiet except for bird calls, coyote song, owls and the occasional large cat.


My sketchbook/journals go with me. In my breaks from whatever hiking or "work" I am doing, I collect my thoughts and do a lot of visual thinking. Sometimes new mixed media pieces are planned but mostly the sketchbooks serve as a repository for ideas or  observations. Photos, scraps of paper or fabric, random thoughts collect here. These pages are a selection for you:
I am always interested in spirals, in textures of wood, rock forms and the phases of the moon.





When I come back to my Home from time in the mountains, I am renewed. Eventually the seeds planted in the sketchbooks will find their way into my imagery.
these two little pieces were part of a series of "dreams", houses holding memory.

For a more extensive tour of my mountain hideaway, please visit my blog and leave a comment, you will be in the drawing for a pdf of my workbook, "Idea to Image". The winner will be drawn by random on October 4.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Susan Brubaker Knapp

My house, my home
Susan Brubaker Knapp here. I took this month’s theme very literally, and decided to sketch my house. We have lived here, in a town north of Charlotte, NC, for the past 17 years. Our house was built in 1916, and is a combination of Queen Anne and Craftsman/Arts and Crafts styles. We live in a neighborhood where most of the houses were built from 1890-1920.

In the years since my mother died, I have been pretty obsessed with genealogy. I just love it when I can find photos of the homes where my ancestors have lived. It somehow helps me understand them better when I can see them in their environment. Here are some of the house photos in my family collection:


The Paulson home in Beaver Falls/New Brighton, PA
My grandmother Dorothy is the girl leaning on the pillar to the right of the steps; the one with the big bow in her hair. Her mother (my great-grandmother Gertrude Drusilla Funkhouser Paulson; I love that name!) is seated in front of the door, and some of Dorothy’s sisters and brothers are also in the photo. The little girl on the steps grew up to be my mother’s piano teacher!


The Thomas and Elizabeth Carter home in Amelia Courthouse, VA, about 1910.
My great-great-grandfather Thomas Carter built this farmhouse about 1870, when he was about 30 years old. He had moved from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It was home to Thomas and Elizabeth’s 11 children. It is still standing (I visited earlier this year), but sadly, it has gone out of our family’s hands.

William and Eliza Carter in front of their home in Newtown, PA, about 1915.
William Carter was my great-great-grand uncle. He came from Northern Ireland around 1850, and lived most of his life near Philadelphia in Bucks County, PA.  


I feel so much more connected to my ancestors, to my genes, to my country’s history, when I can see where they lived. So do yourself, and your descendants, a favor. Take a photo of the places you live. Better yet, take a photo of you, and/or your family, standing in front of your house. Have a print made, and be sure to write the names and date on the back. Your descendants will thank you!

Leaving a sketch of your home is an even more wonderful legacy to leave your descendants. That way, they have a piece of your creativity, your art, to hold in their hands long after you are gone, perhaps long after the house is gone. 

A sketch of a home is also a great way to mark a special occasion, such as a marriage, birth, or anniversary. I sketched the historic home my husband and I rented in Charlottesville, Virginia, as a wedding gift to him in 1994. The house was part of Thomas Jefferson’s father’s Shadwell Plantation, and dated to the 1700s. It was incredibly special.


I included the peacock feathers because our landlords kept peacocks on the property, and we had a special bond with a peahen named Emily. Here’s a closeup of the house sketch/watercolor:


I gave this sketch to my husband on our wedding day. He told me recently that it is one of his most prized possessions. It made me feel really great to know how much he appreciates it.

So come on over to my blog, and I’ll show you how I sketched my current house!

And I’ll be giving away a Moleskine sketchbook – in a cover I will custom design and stitch – to one lucky person who leaves a comment on the post!

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Deborah Boschert

Hi! Deborah here. As you know, our massive blog hop includes posts right here on our Sketchbook Challenge blog, but also on our individual blogs. I'm sharing a fun little video and a give away on my blog! It all ties together, so be sure to check it all out.

"Home and Hideways" is the perfect theme for me. I use homes as shapes and symbols in my artwork all the time! (In fact, sometimes I wonder if I should ban myself from using them in order to find some new personal iconography. But, not yet!)

I created this small art quilt to share with you as part of our massive blog hop.


It's called Dwell and Develop and it measures 12x12 inches. The video on my blog shows lots of detail shots and in-progress photos along with a description of all the steps I took to create this piece. 


Here are some more detail shots and below is a full and comprehensive supply list of the things I used throughout the creation process.


I struggled with that area right about the blue house. Homes and Hideaways are not always just right, are they?


Here is my original photo that I used to create a freezer paper stencil for the painted silhouette in the background of the quilt.

Supplies, where I get them and why I like them. (Lots of these items could be used in sketchbooks and in creating fiber art!)

Fabrics included in the quilt:
  • *commercial fabrics: I love combining hand dyed and stamped cloth with commercial prints. I get prints everywhere from my local quilt shop to chain fabric stores to thrift stores.
  • *solid fabrics: I generally start with solid fabric when I'm creating an original stamped pattern. I love Kona cottons
  • *original fabrics: I've got a stash of fabrics from painting sessions, workshops, playing with gelli prints and other explorations. They are great to include in collages.
  • batting: I generally use acrylic felt for batting in small art quilts. I get it at Joanns. It's 72 inches wide and I buy a few yards at a time and just chop off chunks as I need it.
  • fusible webbing: I love Wonder Under 805 by Pellon. (Also usually buy it at Joanns but only if it's half price or I've got a coupon.
Supplies used to create surface design on the fabric:
  • acrylic paint: Folk Art is my favorite brand. It's available at Michaels.
  • *spouncer brush: Best tool ever for applying paint. Cheap ones available in bulk. Slightly nicer ones. Either are fine.
  • wood block to create stamp: I used an old rubber stamp that I didn't really like any more. Any chunk of wood would do. Actually, it wouldn't even have to be wood.
  • yarn: used to create the stamp for the background... any yarn or string would be fine.
  • paint palette styrofoam tray: I use old meat trays for dipping, spreading and stamping paint.
  • *Micron Pen: It's the best pen for writing on fabric. I like the .08 width -- that's the widest they offer.
  • freezer paper: To create the house sillhouette, I made a stencil with Reynolds freezer paper. Available at your grocery store in the same aisle as the tin foil.
Supplies for stitching:
  • thread: I love Coates and Clarke also from Joanns. Lots of fiber artists are scowling at me for writing that. It's ok. Use whatever works for you.
  • sewing machine: I have a Janome Memory Craft 4800. Love it!
  • *embroidery floss: I mostly use DMC since it's so readily available. But I also love Sublime Stitching's new line of floss
  • *needle: Hands down my favorite needle for hand embroidery is the Embroidery/Redwork Size 8 from Jeana Kimball. 
Embellishment:
  • *square sequins: You will not believe the variety of sequins available from Cartwrights, including square sequins in tons of colors. Plus they are reasonably priced and Cartwright always ships quickly and inexpensively. (One time they even tucked an extra dollar bill in my order because they had overcharged for shipping. That's good karma.)
Snacks:
  • coffee creamer: Every morning and nearly every afternoon, a cuppa coffee with Coffee-Mate hazelnut creamer.
  • grahm crackers: Can't go wrong with the classic HoneyMaid graham cracker.
Podcasts:
I really love listening to podcasts while I'm in the studio. It keeps enough of my brain occupied that I don't think about checking email or other non-urgent distractions. This is only a partial list of some of my favs. All available on iTunes.
  • This American Life: stories about interesting people in unique situations
  • Snap Judgement: edgier stories about interesting people in unique situations
  • Radio Lab: stories about interesting people in unique situations examined through the filter of scientific research
  • WTF: long form interviews with comedians, musician, chefs and other creative types. (Profanity and adult themes, but very insightful.)
  • Ask Me Another: clever, smart, game show format with word games and celebrity guests
Obviously:
  • iron: I love this Panasonic with the titanium soleplate. (But I did not pay $75 which is the current Amazon price. You should shop for a lower price if you're in the market for an iron.)
  • scissors: Havel's makes an amazing line of scissors. 
  • rotary cutter: I like the large Fiskars large size, but whatever works is fine.
  • ruler: Olfa has an endless variety of sizes and shapes.
  • cutting mat: Olfa makes mats too. 
* What's up with the asterisks?! Those items are all included in the "fabric collage inspiration pack" that I'm giving away on my blog! Head over there, watch the video and comment for a chance to win!


Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Sketchbook Challenge Blog Hop ~ Kari McKnight-Holbrook

Home is where the Art Fairies live...


Hello dear ones!  Kari here.  After being on the road so much this year, I am having serious studio separation anxiety.  The theme this month of homes and hideaways really hit a note.  This is how I feel about my home- its a magical place.  And my home studio runs from the peaked window at the top all the way over to the end of the house on the left.

I do have woods and creeks and a large pond and a barn, and even an ancient native american burial mound.  I have fields and apple trees and wild blackberry patches.  And no matter what anyone says, I think I have fairies and unicorns that play with the deer, fox, skunks, and raccoons.  We've even had a bear or two.  And my parents live right down the path, my brother and his family live right across the creek.  My grandparents lived across the creek too, until Grandpa passed away 4 years ago. Aunt, Uncle and cousins right beside them.  So this is my comfort zone, my nest- my hideaway.

I think I can only leave and travel so very much because I've always had this to come back home to.  I think it's so important to make your home, or your studio a place you want to come home to!  It calms your muse and lets her concentrate on important work like making art.  I thought I might share what accomplishes this for me.

To give me more storage, Dad and Mike built a half wall that gives me cabinets and counter space and hides shelving on the other side.  The cabinets were pulled from my office at work when they were remodeling.
I could have had fancy studio furniture and features, when I was putting it in new, however, I chose to fill it with things that make me cozy and comfortable.  Things I grew up with, things I was used to using at the office I had grown up working in.  I used furniture my parents bought when they were first married in order to house papers, maps and patterns.  I feel connected to the past with these pieces- grounded.


My most treasured possession is under that blue oilcloth.  It is the drafting table my Dad built for himself while he was in school to become and architect.  I have many many memories of him at that table!
The sloped ceilings were a bit of a challenge.  It was difficult to hang things, and made storage underneath a bit shallow.  Then we hit upon curtain rods!  Voila!  Ribbon storage galore, even for a shorty like myself!

I surround myself with the things I love, and make nice little tabletop displays.  It gives me a calm "resting" area, even if the room is messy and cluttered.  For example, my ironstone collection.


I feel even more "at home" and cozy because I have little bits of love tacked up all over the studio.  Art from nieces and nephews, art from friends near and far.




















And my books.  Oh how I love my books!  Fatbooks, sketchbooks, blank books!  I can lose myself in books!   



I spend tons of time here when I am home.  However, I DON'T do most of my sketching here- weird huh?  I spend the majority of my time here making my sketches come to life.  Usually I sketch when I am away, or its the middle of the night, or on a plane.  I sketch and give myself notes of what I want to do once I get back here!!  Or I do the messy painting stuff here, and sketch with a pen and marker on the painted prepared backgrounds when I am out and about.

For example- I sketched this out (generally only for me- as a reminder) when I was on a plane coming home from Texas one time.  3 weeks later, the fairies were born.




 


















And these sprung up out of my visit to a 'doll hospital.'






Here the journal helped me fully flesh out an idea for a future project and class, even while I was in the surgery waiting room for my husbands spinal surgery.  Both calming and productive for me.  Once I was able to get back into the studio, I was miles ahead of the game, able to work quickly in my nest, because I had thought it out in my sketchbook first!






Besides all my sketchbooks, I have tons of inspiration boards all around my studio, and over on my blog, I'll show you some up close.  There is also a giveaway for my "Backgrounds to Bindings" video over there- so pop on over:)